Clarifying What You Heard, Asking for Repetition, and Confirming Your Understanding in Business English

Even if you have been speaking English for years, you are going to find yourself in a situation where someone uses a word or a phrase you don’t know, speaks a little too fast, or mumbles (speaks unclearly).

The other person might be using slang or a technical term you’re not familiar with.

Or they simply may not have expressed themselves clearly.

In situations like these, you should not feel embarrassed or assume that it has to do with your language ability!

This happens to native speakers as well, and that is why we have a number of polite questions and expressions that we can use to clarify what we heard.

These expressions are frequently used in the business context, as this is often when you need to clarify what the other person said to continue negotiations or strategic planning.

You can also use these phrases in everyday circumstances.

If you are having a lengthy conversation with someone, chances are you’ll need to clarify something they’ve said.

Remember, sometimes people do not express their ideas clearly, or they ramble (talk about a topic for a long time without focus).

Before assuming it’s you or your English, ask a clarifying question and confirm your understanding to bring the focus of the conversation back to the most important topics.


Clarify What You Heard by Asking for Repetition

If you feel like you missed a key word or phrase during an explanation, or you would like the other person to repeat himself, there are a number of questions you can ask in order to clarify what you heard.

Keep in mind that many of these questions use an introductory phrase like “Would you mind…?” or “Could I ask you…?” or “Could you…?” in order to make the question a little more polite.

You can also start with a small apology, like “Sorry,” “Just a second,” “Sorry to interrupt.”

Finally, you might want to admit that you didn’t understand by saying “I didn’t catch that,” or “I didn’t get that.”

This shows that you are listening, but you want to make sure you understood all the important details.

(As a bonus, asking clarifying questions helps you remember what you heard.)

  • Would you mind repeating that for me again?
  • Would you mind going over that one more time?
  • Sorry, could I ask you to tell me that (piece of information) again?
  • Could you clarify what you meant by (challenging word)?
  • Just a second, could I get a little more clarification on (X topic)? I just want to be sure I understood.
  • Sorry to interrupt, but I didn’t catch that. Could you run it by me one more time?
  • Could you be more specific?
  • I don’t think I got your meaning. Could you go over that again?
  • I don’t think I quite understand what you meant. Would you mind repeating that?

Confirm Your Understanding By Repeating and Restating the Other Person’s Idea

Another way to be sure you’ve understood what the other person is saying is to repeat what you heard using your own words.

Restating the other person’s idea is a great way to show that you were listening carefully.

It also helps the other person find a way to simplify or clarify what he or she said if you’ve misheard or misunderstood a key point.

As I mentioned earlier, sometimes the person speaking needs to rethink what he said and say it again more clearly!

  • Let me see if I understood correctly.
  • Can I just check what I got from that?
  • I’d just like to confirm that I got that right.
  • My impression of what you said was…  Is that what you meant?
  • So what you are saying is… Does that sound right?
  • You mean that we should (do X action and Y action). Is that right?
  • Do I understand you to mean…
  • If I understand you correctly, you are saying…
  • Am I reading your suggestion right, when you said…?
  • You mean…?
  • I think you are saying…
  • In other words…

As you notice in these examples, there are many introductory phrases that you can use to indicate what you heard.

By emphasizing that you are repeating their ideas to check and confirm your understanding, you show them that you take accuracy seriously and want to make sure you’ve got all the information you need before moving forward.

Ending with a question enables the other person to clarify any confusion and provide additional details that he feels are important.

Restating ideas is an excellent way to avoid misunderstandings and also enables you to ask for clarification without having to say directly that you didn’t understand everything.

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Say Thank You and Show You Understood

After the person you are talking to has repeated what they said, provided additional information, or clarified your doubts, be sure to say thank you and state that you now understand the concepts better.

This allows you to move on to other topics and assures the other person that you are now on the same page (have the same understanding of a topic).

  • Thanks for clarifying. I understand better now.
  • Thank you for repeating that. It makes more sense to me.
  • Thanks for explaining your point of view again. That helps me see where you’re coming from.
  • Thanks. We seem to be on the same page now.
  • I appreciate the clarification. Glad we agree on that.

Your Turn

Do you feel more comfortable clarifying what you heard, asking for repetition, and confirming your understanding after reading this post? I hope so.

You can use these phrases for ask for clarification on something I’ve written above!

Leave a comment below with a question you have – and start it with a phrase. Or rephrase what I said, and use a question to check for understanding.

Ready to communicate more effectively in conversations? Learn communication skills that enable you to connect with other people and engage in natural conversations and professional discussions. Get started here.

7 thoughts on “Clarifying What You Heard, Asking for Repetition, and Confirming Your Understanding in Business English”

  1. Wow Kim, I did a whole one-hour webinar on this topic for listeners who have trouble catching what natives say in conversation, but in 5-minutes you’ve managed to cover the same issues and share more expressions than I managed. Well done!

    I’ll make sure I share this on social media with my tribe because it’s always useful to have some expressions at the ready to deal with the inevitable situation of not catching what someone says!

    • Hi Cara! Thank you for sharing this article with your learners! It is so important that non-native speakers have these skills so that they feel more empowered to keep the conversation focused. After all, listening is an active skill, as you well know! 🙂

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